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Article
April 1930

GOITER: MANAGEMENT OF THE POOR SURGICAL RISK

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Surg. 1930;20(4):591-606. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1930.01150100051003
Abstract

Since the advent of aseptic surgery, the introduction of iodine in the preoperative preparation of patients with exophthalmic goiter has been the most momentous single advance made in the surgical treatment for diseases of the thyroid gland. Viewed either as to its revolutionary beginning or as to its far-reaching effect on the whole field of surgical treatment for the thyroid gland, the year of its discovery has opened a new era in the progress of this branch of surgery. The contrasts between the new and the old are great. In numerous articles attention has been called to the pronounced effect of the administration of iodine on the pathologic changes in the gland and on the course of the disease as evidenced particularly by the change in the symptoms and the appearance of the patient, by the lowering of the basal metabolic rate and by the absence of severe postoperative explosive

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