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Article
June 1930

AUTOGENOUS FREE CARTILAGE TRANSPLANTED INTO JOINTS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Laboratory of Surgical Research and the Department of Pathology, the Lakeside Hospital and the Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1930;20(6):885-896. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1930.01150120003001
Abstract

Experimental investigation of the behavior of autogenous free cartilage in the joint space has been made difficult by the early attachment of such cartilage to the synovial membrane.

Strangeways1 expressed the view that articular cartilage derived its nutriment from the synovial fluid and that loose cartilaginous bodies not only survived in the joint cavities, but also increased in size. Such clinical evidence led Fisher2 at about the same time to suggest the following two possibilities referable to the nutrition of cartilage: (1) that plasma flowed into the joint from the capillaries lying in the cancellous plates abutting on the calcified layer, or (2) that plasma flowing into the joint from the plexus of vessels lying beneath the synovia at the margin of the articular cartilage was the source of this nutrition. He also believed that cartilage cells free in a joint retained their vitality in almost every case

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