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Article
December 1930

MECHANICS OF COLLAPSE THERAPY AND ITS INDICATIONS: OBSERVATIONS IN SEVEN HUNDRED CASES

Arch Surg. 1930;21(6):1134-1145. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1930.01150180250015
Abstract

Among thoracic surgeons and others interested in the treatment for pulmonary disease, there still seems to be a divergence of opinion as to the mechanics involved in collapse therapy. My only justification in presenting this paper, which dwells chiefly on the fundamental principles involved in these procedures, is to present my deductions on the subject, based on observations on 700 operative cases. I hope that it will bring out discussion that may lead to a better understanding.

While in a few patients with pulmonary tuberculosis the lesions heal by resolution, as do those in nontuberculous pneumonia, by far the greater number heal after the formation and contraction of newly formed, fibrous, connective tissue has caused their encapsulation. Rest to the lung, by causing a slowing of the lymph flow and a retarded circulation, results in a lessened toxemia and an increased production of this fibrous tissue. By prohibiting this rest

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