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Article
February 1931

TRAUMA TO THE INTESTINES: THE IMPORTANCE OF THE LOCAL LOSS OF FLUID IN THE PRODUCTION OF LOW BLOOD PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Department of Surgery of Vanderbilt University.

Arch Surg. 1931;22(2):314-324. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160020137008
Abstract

Of the different methods that have been employed in producing "shock" in experimental animals, probably the most frequently used has been that of trauma to the intestines. Mann1 stated, "The easiest and most certain method of producing shock is by exposure and traumatization of the abdominal viscera. This, judging from the literature, has been the method used by nearly all investigators of shock." Several investigators have gone so far as to state that this is the only method by which shock can be produced experimentally. However, during the past ten years, the method of traumatizing large areas of skeletal muscle as described by Cannon and Bayliss2 has been used probably with equal frequency.

It has been commonly believed by many that "shock," regardless of the method of its production, is associated with an accumulation of blood in the capacious splanchnic area. Wallace, Fraser and Drummond,3 in many

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