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Article
April 1931

EXPERIMENTAL SHOCK: VI. THE PROBABLE CAUSE FOR THE REDUCTION IN THE BLOOD PRESSURE FOLLOWING MILD TRAUMA TO AN EXTREMITY

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University.

Arch Surg. 1931;22(4):598-609. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160040074004
Abstract

In a recent communication,1 the results of experiments in which the blood pressure was reduced to a low level in short periods of time were reported. The time which elapsed in these experiments between the initiation of the trauma and the reduction of the pressure to the desired level varied approximately from one to six hours. The difference in weight of the traumatized and nontraumatized extremites in all instances amounted to more than 4 per cent of the body weight. Johnson and Blalock2 found that when a normal dog is bled 0.5 per cent of its body weight at one hour intervals, the blood pressure is usually reduced to a very low level after from eight to ten hours. No evidence was found for the action of a histamine-like substance which causes an immediate general loss of fluid from the blood stream. However, these experiments were probably not

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