[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 52.200.130.163. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1931

EXPERIMENTAL SHOCK: VIII. THE COMPOSITION OF THE BLOOD STREAM AFTER MILD AFTER TRAUMA TO AFTER FLUID THAT ESCAPES FROM THE TRAUMA TO AN EXTREMITY, THE INTESTINES AND BURNS

Arch Surg. 1931;22(4):617-625. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160040093006
Abstract

In previous communications1 the amount of fluid that is lost from the blood stream at the site of injury after severe trauma to an extremity, after mild trauma to an extremity, after trauma to the intestines and after burns was reported. When an extremity is traumatized severely, the fluid that escapes into the injured subcutaneous tissues and muscles consists largely of whole blood. Some red blood cells escape from the blood vessels after mild trauma to an extremity and after trauma to the intestines, but the proportion is much smaller than after severe trauma. Burns are associated with the escape of clear fluid with few red cells into the subcutaneous tissues. Gasser, Erlanger and Meek2 found that the protein content of the plasma of the blood underwent no marked change during the process of the concentration of the blood after clamping the aorta, and they believed that the

×