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Article
April 1931

THE ABSORPTION OF DEXTROSE FROM THE COLON: II. A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL EXCITANTS AND OF STIMULANTS ON DEXTROSE ENEMA

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO; SEATTLE

Arch Surg. 1931;22(4):649-657. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160040125009
Abstract

Results obtained by us1 previously in experiments carried out on dogs indicate that a 5 per cent aqueous solution of dextrose is not absorbed from the colon to any appreciable extent. Tap water and physiologic solution of sodium chloride are rapidly and efficiently absorbed. As a control in those experiments we exposed the ileum simultaneously to the same solutions in the same dog by using the same technic, and variable but considerable absorption was observed.

This study was continued in order to observe the fate of dextrose in enemas made up of equal parts of 5 per cent solution of dextrose and solutions of various chemicals that might possibly act as excitants or stimulants to absorption. The fact that a 0.9 per cent solution of sodium chloride was readily absorbed by the large bowel suggested that salt might favor the absorption of dextrose when the two substances are mixed

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