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July 1931

OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANSA RÉSUMÉ OF THE THEORIES OF ETIOLOGY AND THE CONSIDERATION OF HEREDITY AS AN ETIOLOGIC FACTOR

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, and the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Surg. 1931;23(1):1-25. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160070004001
Abstract

Osteochondritis dissecans is a noninfectious process involving the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone of certain long bones of the extremities, which, by sequestration from the articular surface, usually produces a single foreign body or, more rarely, two, in the contiguous joint. This body is originally of an osseocartilaginous composition, but its structure subsequently undergoes alteration by the fluids in the joints. The mesial half of the articular surface of the internal femoral condyle is the site most frequently involved, but the heads of the radius, femur and humerus may also be the sites of the process. Osteochondritis dissecans occurs preeminently in youth, and most commonly in the tall, rapidly growing boy.

OTHER TYPES OF BODIES OF THE JOINTS  Free bodies within the joints are encountered in conditions other than osteochondritis dissecans. All such bodies are grouped under the common heading of corpora libera articulorum or "joint mice."1. Free

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