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Article
July 1931

SPONTANEOUS RUPTURE OF THE URINARY BLADDER: REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

PROVIDENCE, R. I.
From the Gynecological Service of the Rhode Island Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1931;23(1):129-144. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160070132009
Abstract

Rupture of the bladder by penetrating wounds was familiar to the ancients. Homer describes the death of Phereclus due to a spear wound passing from the buttock, through the perineum into the bladder. Spontaneous rupture, however, seems to have been recognized rather late in the history of medicine, as the first recorded case that an extensive review of the literature reveals is that of Pierus in 1279. For the next five centuries the cases of rupture of the bladder that were found were all of the traumatic type. The next reported case of spontaneous rupture was presented by Johnstone in 1773. Reports have become increasingly frequent since that time, until it is possible to review forty such cases to date. To these are added the two cases reported in this article.

The paucity of cases may seem surprising, but it is partially due to the definition of the term "spontaneous

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