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Article
September 1931

HISTOLOGIC STUDIES OF THE BRAIN IN CASES OF FATAL INJURY TO THE HEAD: II. CHANGES IN THE CHOROID PLEXUS AND EPENDYMA

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Arch Surg. 1931;23(3):357-425. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160090002001
Abstract

As was outlined in a preliminary report by one of us,1 a frequent observation in cases of fatal injury to the head is edema of the brain, as well as an increase in the amount of fluid in the ventricular system and in the subarachnoid spaces. We will discuss the question of changes in the brain substance in a later contribution. It is well known that in the majority of cases following injury to the head there is an actual increase in the amount of circulating cerebrospinal fluid. This may be demonstrated clinically by lumbar puncture, when it is usual to find an increase both in pressure and in the amount of recoverable fluid. Several questions present themselves: What is the source or sources of this fluid? Why should there be an excess of the fluid following trauma? What part, if any, does this increase of fluid play in

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