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Article
September 1931

CALCIFICATION IN THE SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUES: REPORT OF A CASE ASSOCIATED WITH CHRONIC ATROPHIC ARTHRITIS

Arch Surg. 1931;23(3):513-520. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160090158006
Abstract

A brief résumé of the various theories advanced to explain the formation of the deposits of calcium or calcification follows.

Pauli and Samec1 showed that in a colloidal albuminous solution, calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate are many times more soluble than in water. These salts could therefore be carried in the blood in nearly the same form as they are found in the deposits.

Holt, La Mer and Chown2 demonstrated that blood serum is normally saturated up to 200 per cent with neutral calcium phosphate, and that this salt will remain for days without precipitating. They thought, however, that most of the calcium is carried in the form of the much more readily soluble acid carbonate and acid phosphates which may be changed into the neutral salts by the loss of carbon dioxide.

Barille3 held that calcium is contained in the blood as a double salt, calcium

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