[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1931

PRIMARY CARCINOMA OF THE JEJUNUM: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Associate Chief Surgeon of Mount Zion Hospital; Intern, Mount Zion Hospital SAN FRANCISCO
From the Surgical Service of Mount Zion Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1931;23(5):805-812. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160110096004
Abstract

Primary carcinoma of the jejunum is of interest because of its rarity, because of its amenability to proper surgical treatment and because of its disturbing tendency to be overlooked in diagnosis. The jejunum is relatively highly immune to the development of primary carcinoma, more so than any other portion of the intestine, including the duodenum.

Accurate estimation of the percentage of the occurrence of primary carcinoma of the jejunum is difficult because of its rarity, but a review of a large series of autopsies reveals that the incidence of this condition is roughly 1 per cent of all intestinal carcinoma.

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  A series of 41,883 autopsies at the Vienna General Hospital (Johnson1), including 343 cases of intestinal carcinoma, did not reveal a single case of carcinoma of the jejunum.In 1904, Nothnagel2 found 9 cases in 3,585 deaths from cancer. In 1927, Hellström3 collected

×