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Article
November 1931

EXPERIMENTAL SHOCK: XI. A STUDY OF THE ALTERATIONS IN THE VOLUME OF BLOOD AND IN THE WATER CONTENT OF BLOOD AND OF MUSCLE THAT ARE PRODUCED BY HISTAMINE

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Departments of Physiology and Surgery of Vanderbilt University.

Arch Surg. 1931;23(5):848-854. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160110139007
Abstract

The possibility that histamine is the cause of "shock" after trauma has been extensively speculated on in recent years. Keith1 and others have found that severe injuries are followed by a diminution of the volume of blood. Harris and one of us (Dr. Blalock)2 found that trauma to the muscles and to the intestines and burns are associated with a decrease in the water in the blood and in the muscles other than those at the sites of the injuries. The study indicated that the loss of fluid from the blood stream into and from the traumatized areas was responsible for the concentration of the blood. It is known that histamine causes an increase in the concentration of the blood. Since histamine causes a general dilatation of capillaries and possibly an increase in their permeability, it was believed that histamine would probably cause a general loss of fluid

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