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Article
September 1932

THE BREAKING STRENGTH OF HEALING FRACTURED FIBULAE OF RATS: III. OBSERVATIONS ON A HIGH FAT DIET

Author Affiliations

Davis and Geck Fellow in Surgery; Research Assistant in Surgery NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1932;25(3):467-497. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1932.01160210036004
Abstract

In previous papers we presented an original method for the determination of the healing and breaking strength of fractured and unfractured fibulae of rats on a standard diet. From a consideration of the evidence of the close correlation existing between all parts of the skeleton that was presented at that time, the conclusion was reached that the normal strength of bone may vary widely within comparatively short periods of time, that the unfractured fibula of the left leg will gain and lose strength simultaneously with similar gains and losses in the fractured right fibula of the right leg, and that a close relationship exists between variations in the animal weights, the quantity of food that the rats eat and the strength of the fibulae. No attempt was made to evaluate these factors beyond briefly considering the possibility that there may be present in the diet a definite substance that exerts

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