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Article
November 1932

INTERNAL HERNIA: THREE ADDITIONAL CASE REPORTS

Author Affiliations

AKRON, OHIO

Arch Surg. 1932;25(5):909-925. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1932.01160230092008
Abstract

The subject of internal hernia is one that surgical textbooks have largely neglected. Although Watson, in his volume on hernia, devoted a chapter to the subject, and H. B. Stone also mentioned internal hernias in some detail, in many instances but little attention is paid them. They are comparatively rare, but for that very reason are important since their rarity makes their diagnosis difficult.

By the term internal hernia is meant a protrusion into pouches or openings in the peritoneum in contrast to hernias through defects in the retaining walls of the abdomen. There are many varieties. Watson classed as most common those of the duodenal fossae described by Eppinger, Treitz and Landzert: the pericecal, the intersigmoid and those through the foramen of Winslow. Stone said that the most frequent are those about the duodenojejunal junction: the cecum, the mesentery of the sigmoid and through the foramen of Winslow.

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