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Article
October 1933

SURGICAL ASPECTS OF RENAL AGENESIS: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO HYPOPLASTIC KIDNEY, RENAL APLASIA AND CONGENITAL ABSENCE OF ONE KIDNEY

Author Affiliations

Assistant Attending Surgeon and Chief of Clinic of the Department of Urology, James Buchanan Brady Foundation of the New York Hospital; Attending Urologist, Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled and Stuyvesant Square Hospital, formerly the New York Skin and Cancer Hospital NEW YORK
From the Department of Urology, James Buchanan Brady Foundation of the New York Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1933;27(4):686-735. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1933.01170100060005
Abstract

Among the most enigmatic surgical anomalies of the upper urinary tract which interest the medical profession and particularly the surgical specialist are the three much confused borderline conditions of hypoplastic kidney, renal aplasia and congenital absence of one kidney. All of these have clinically the same common denominator, in that when the supposedly sound kidney is removed at operation for an associated pathologic process, the outcome is promptly and inevitably anuria and death. But fortunately, the time has come when these three very hazardous and unrecognized conditions of the past can be differentiated and accurately identified before postmortem examination.

A survey of the literature on this rather obscure subject reveals that the underlying cause of such a compromising situation is an embryonic malformation and lack of proper development of the urinary organs, which is also commonly associated with developmental defects of the genital organs. The problem is further confused by

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