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Article
December 1933

EXPERIMENTAL CHRONIC ARTHRITIS (SYNOVITIS): PRODUCED BY INTRA-ARTICULAR INJECTIONS OF BACTERIAL FILTRATES AND OTHER FOREIGN PROTEINS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery of the University of Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1933;27(6):1065-1071. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1933.01170120089002
Abstract

In recent years the allergic hypothesis for the etiology of chronic arthritis, especially the proliferative type, has received considerable attention.1 According to this theory, the articular changes are local manifestations of a generalized allergic state. As early as 1902, Menzer2 suggested that streptococci first gained access to the joints, but that this did not result in inflammatory changes until antibodies were produced. Further researches by Weintraud,3 Henry,4 Faber,5 Friedberger,6 Freiberg,7 Klinge8 and Gudzent9 demonstrated that arthritic changes could be produced in experimental animals by first sensitizing the animal to bacterial or nonbacterial proteins and then by injecting the antigen into the joints. Similar results were obtained if the antigen was injected first into the joint and later into the general circulation. Swift10 and his coworkers have recently studied experimental streptococcus allergy in rabbits, with the view of explaining the etiology

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