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Article
January 1934

TERATOMA TESTIS: FIFTEEN CASES STUDIED MICROSCOPICALLY AND BIOLOGICALLY

Author Affiliations

U. S. Navy BROOKLYN
From the Cancer Service of the United States Naval Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1934;28(1):1-11. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01170130004001
Abstract

Ewing,1 in 1911, after a special study of malignant tumors of the testicle, came to the conclusion that "with relatively few exceptions tumors of the testicle belong in the embryonal class and that the great majority or possibly all of these embryonal tumors are of teratomatous origin." He classified testicular teratomas as follows: (1) adult embryomas or teratomas; (2) embryoid, teratoid or mixed tumors; (3) embryonal malignant tumors, and (4) miscellaneous tumors. He stated that the most common malignant tumor of the testis is embryonal carcinoma, alveolar or diffuse, with polyhedral or round cells and often with lymphoid stroma, which is probably a one-sided development of teratoma.

This view was contrary to the belief of Chevassu,2 who in 1906 classified the testicular tumors in the 128 cases which he reported as follows:

He stated that the majority of malignant testicular tumors were either degenerated embryomas or seminomas (a

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