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Article
January 1934

EXPERIMENTAL OCCLUSION OF THE PULMONARY ARTERY: PATHOLOGIC PHYSIOLOGY

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Departments of Surgery and Pathology of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1934;28(1):150-159. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01170130153009
Abstract

Welch,1 Plumier,2 Tigerstedt,3 Underhill4 and others have stated that ligation of the pulmonary artery of one lung causes very little or no change in the systemic blood pressure. Haggart and Walker5 found no significant variation in the general circulation of animals until from 52 to 66 per cent of the pulmonary circulation had been occluded. Tigerstedt3 showed that there was a slight decrease in the volume output of the left ventricle per minute after one branch of the pulmonary artery had been ligated. Lichtheim6 found no significant variation of the general circulation after occluding 75 per cent of the pulmonary circulation. Mann,7 producing pulmonary embolism by the introduction of clots into the venous system (the femoral vein), noted a slight drop in the systemic pressure, which he believed to be due to the passage of the embolus through the valves of the

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