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Article
February 1934

HYPERINSULINEMIA SECONDARY TO AN ADENOMA OF THE PANCREAS: REPORT OF A CASE WITH OPERATIVE CURE

Arch Surg. 1934;28(2):223-231. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01170140003001
Abstract

Since the liberation of insulin, by the monumental work of Banting and Best1 in 1922, the clinical syndrome of hypoglycemia or insulin shock has become a well recognized medical entity and one with which the average clinician is now fully familiar.

That such a state, so-called hyperinsulinemia, might arise spontaneously within the human body as a result of the overproduction of insulin by the cells of the islands of Langerhans was first suggested by Harris2 in 1924.

Krause,3 Marsh,4 Gammon and Tenery,5 and Heyn6 have reported cases presenting the clinical picture of recurrent hypoglycemia in which the blood sugar values during the attacks ranged from 33 to 60 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters.

Since none of the foregoing cases has come to autopsy or been surgically explored, the hypoglycemia cannot be irrefutably ascribed to hyperinsulinemia resulting from hyperplasia or tumorous proliferation of the islet

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