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Article
March 1934

PEPTIC ULCER: IX. CHRONIC LESIONS OF THE DUODENUM FOLLOWING EXPERIMENTALLY PRODUCED PYLORIC DYSFUNCTION

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Surgery and Gynecology, University of Virginia UNIVERSITY, VA.
From the Department of Surgery and Gynecology, University of Virginia.

Arch Surg. 1934;28(3):467-478. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01170150044003
Abstract

Some demonstrable and appreciable dysfunction of the pylorus is often found in patients who have peptic ulcer, whether the ulcer is situated in the stomach or in the duodenum. The dysfunction is not a passive stenosis but an active disturbance of the normal rhythm of the pylorus. Roentgenologically and at the time of operation, various degrees of spasm, hypertonicity and occasionally even slight hypertrophy have been demonstrated so frequently that they are generally accepted as phenomena almost concomitant with peptic ulcer. For this reason atropine, which tends to relax the pylorus, has been used for a long time in the medical management of patients with peptic ulcer and not infrequently seems to be a real factor in the amelioration of symptoms and the control of certain forms of the disease.

Two conflicting theories concerning dysfunction of the pylorus in cases of peptic ulcer have been advanced. One is that the

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