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Article
June 1934

TOXEMIA IN ACUTE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION: TOXICITY OF INTESTINAL CONTENTS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE PANCREATICODUODENAL SECRETION

Author Affiliations

INDIANAPOLIS
From the Research Division, Indiana University School of Medicine; the Eli Lily Research Fellowship.

Arch Surg. 1934;28(6):1102-1120. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01170180104006
Abstract

In general, the experimental studies on the causes of death in acute intestinal obstruction have resulted in a tangle of conflicting opinions. The work of Haden and Orr1 on the significance of chemical changes in the blood threw a new light on the problem, and this led to a series of investigations2 which in part offer an explanation for the lack of agreement in previous experimental work. It is now generally conceded that the issue is clarified by a recognition of two fundamental types of intestinal obstruction: (1) simple obstruction and (2) strangulation. In simple intestinal obstruction in which there is no interference with the circulation of the intestinal wall, the chief cause of death is the metabolic disturbance resulting from the loss of fluids and electrolytes. Obstruction, however, is practically always complicated by damage to the intestine from overdistention or strangulation. Although the importance of dehydration and

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