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Article
July 1934

PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL THROMBOSIS: SECONDARY TO GONORRHEAL ARTHRITIS AND INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTION OF MILK

Author Affiliations

DULUTH, MINN.; MINNEAPOLIS

Arch Surg. 1934;29(1):49-53. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01180010052006
Abstract

Primary arterial thrombosis of nonembolic origin has been stated1 to be unquestionably of bacterial origin. Only within the past thirty years, however, has much attention been directed toward, or any observation made of, thrombosis associated with infectious fevers. Arterial thrombosis is not considered to be unusual in cases of influenza, but in the other infectious diseases in which it has been encountered it is described as an uncommon complication. Welch2 stated that arterial thrombosis associated with gonorrhea is very rare. Heller's3 collection of only twenty-six instances from the literature illustrates its infrequency of occurrence.

Frazier1 stated that chemical changes in the blood resulting in a liberation of fibrin ferment must be considered as an important etiologic factor in the production of arterial thrombosis. Welch stated that this factor is of undoubted importance, especially in thrombosis in toxic conditions. It is entirely conceivable that the intramuscular injection

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