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Article
February 1935

GASTRIC SECRETIONVI. THE ACTION OF PILOCARPINE ON THE SECRETIONS OF A TRANSPLANTED GASTRIC POUCH WITHOUT AUERBACH'S PLEXUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
Dr. Klein died on Oct. 2, 1932.; From the Service of Dr. A. A. Berg and the Department of Laboratories, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1935;30(2):277-283. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1935.01180080101007
Abstract

Although there is no doubt that nervous stimuli excite gastric secretion, the precise source of the autonomic nerves which reach the secreting cells is as yet unknown. Two methods have been available for study: (1) histologic examination and (2) the use of drugs that stimulate and inhibit the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems. Utilizing transplanted subcutaneous gastric pouches previously described,1 it seemed likely that these might yield results with the appropriate drugs. The pouches were constructed from the body and fundus of the stomach after stripping away the muscular coats together with the myenteric plexus and consisted of mucous membrane and submucosa. They were transplanted to the subcutaneous tissues of the abdominal wall with the blood supply at first intact. The blood vessels were severed at a subsequent operation. The result was a pouch deprived of vagus and sympathetic nerves and also of the myenteric plexus. Only the submucous plexus

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