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Article
June 1935

VASO-ORCHIDOSTOMY WITH INTERPOSED SPERMATOCELE: A PROCEDURE FOR TREATMENT OF STERILITY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Surgical Services of the Beth Israel and the Montefiore Hospitals.

Arch Surg. 1935;30(6):967-973. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1935.01180120061004
Abstract

The first recorded surgical attempt to reestablish the seminiferous channels was that of Bardenheuer,1 who in 1886, following excision of the epididymis for tuberculosis, implanted the cut distal end of the vas deferens in the testis. Since then many operations have been devised for the relief of male sterility due to obstructive lesions in the epididymides. These fall into three main categories:

1. Vaso-epididymostomy2

2. Vaso-orchidostomy3

3. Miscellaneous operations

(a) Vaso-orchidocystostomy4

(b) Sac epididymostomy5

(c) Transplantation of the saphenous vein as a substitute for the vas deferens6

(d) Vaso-urethrostomy7

There are valid objections to most of these operations on anatomic and physiologic grounds.8

It appears from a review of the literature that Martin's vaso-epididymostomy with technical modifications is the most popular and the most successful operation for the reestablishment of the seminiferous channels following bilateral obstructive epididymitis. The largest series of cases

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