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Article
June 1935

PERITONEAL DRAINAGERESISTANCE OF SINUS TRACT TO INFECTION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the laboratory of Surgical Research, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1935;30(6):1032-1035. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1935.01180120126011
Abstract

Drainage of the peritoneal cavity has been shown to be a futile and, in fact, a harmful procedure in many of the conditions in which it was formerly advocated. There remain, however, three definite indications for the use of drains in the abdominal cavity: first, to control bleeding by the hemostatic effect of a foreign body; second, to provide an outlet for a localized infection of the peritoneal surface and thus to prevent formation of abscesses, and third, to produce a sinus tract through which substances may escape from a walled-off area within the abdomen without soiling the general peritoneal surfaces. In the third instance it is of considerable importance to know how soon the sinus tract forms and how soon the tissues comprising its walls become impervious to the passage of pathogenic organisms.

A number of investigators have shown that a foreign body left as a drain in the

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