[Skip to Navigation]
Sign In
Article
August 1935

PILONIDAL SINUS: AN EXPLANATION OF ITS EMBRYOLOGIC DEVELOPMENT

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Departments of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine and Charity Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1935;31(2):175-189. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1935.01180140003001
Abstract

The term "pilonidal," derived from the Latin pilus, meaning hair, and nidus, meaning nest, was first applied to sinuses in the sacral region by Hodges1 in 1880. However, the lesion was in all probability first described by J. W. Warren1 in 1867. Since the first description of the lesion many terms have been suggested, such as "coccygeal, sacrococcygeal or sacral sinus, dimple or fistula"; "postanal dimple, fistula or fissure"; "posterior umbilicus"; "postsacral or sequestration dermoid." From clinical usage the term "pilonidal sinus" has supplanted practically all of the other terms. At present the term "pilonidal cyst" or "pilonidal sinus" should be limited to those cysts or sinuses having their origin from the medullary canal, which should not be confused with the simple type of sacral dimple.

The etiology of this interesting anomaly has been most intriguing to the majority of writers describing the sinus, as attested by the

Add or change institution
×