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Article
December 1936

OSSIFICATION: THE INFLUENCE OF THE MINERAL CONSTITUENTS OF BONE

Author Affiliations

OMAHA
From the Departments of Surgery and Physiology, University of Nebraska, College of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1936;33(6):926-939. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1936.01190060016002
Abstract

To explain the process by which bone is formed two theories have long existed, the chemical, or humoral, theory and the cellular, or vital, theory. These theories diverge principally in respect to whether or not osteoblasts take a part, secretory or otherwise, in the synthesis of the mineral elements into bone. Exponents of both views agree, obviously, that ossification can take place only in the presence of an adequate supply of calcium and of the other constituents of bone, but whether the process can be initiated, hastened or otherwise favorably influenced by a local supply in excess of normal and whether synthetic bone salts introduced into the site of ossification can be utilized by the organism are controversial subjects with which this report of investigation is concerned.

From a study of much clinical and experimental material, Leriche and Policard,1 early advocates of the chemical theory, were led to sider: . . .

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