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Article
April 1938

CALCIFICATION AND OSSIFICATION IN TUBERCULOMA OF THE BRAIN: REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE AND REPORT OF THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

COLUMBUS, OHIO; LOS ANGELES
From the Department of Neurology, College of Medical Evangelists, and the Cajal Laboratory of Neuropathology, Los Angeles County Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1938;36(4):637-659. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1938.01190220079006
Abstract

The intracranial lesions which come to be the seat of calcareous deposits or bony formation vary remarkably in nature and location. Calcification of the pineal body and of the choroid plexus and formation of bone in the dura and in its reduplications seem to be the result of regressive change and are of no clinical importance. On the other hand, roentgenograms of the skull of a patient who has presented symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure or of some localized lesion occasionally disclose an abnormal shadow cast by calcareous or osseous deposits. As demonstrated in a series of over 600 cases of intracranial tumor in which autopsy was done, which were studied in the Cajal Laboratory, calcification is most likely to occur within a true neoplasm. In a few instances, however, the lesion has turned out to be of some other character, such as a calcified tuberculoma. Three examples

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