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Article
May 1938

INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE ON THE LOSS OF BLOOD IN INTESTINAL STRANGULATION

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota.

Arch Surg. 1938;36(5):816-837. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1938.01190230095006
Abstract

In the past, numerous attempts have been made to ascribe the disastrous effects of all types of intestinal obstruction to some one etiologic factor. Of the many explanations offered, that of intestinal toxemia has been given greatest consideration. Literally hundreds of investigators have tried to show that this or that toxin was the one responsible for the dire results. However, there has been no general agreement as to what toxin was to blame. This, together with the fact that no theory of intestinal toxemia has ever offered any benefit to the patient in the way of improved methods of treatment or lowered mortality, has cast grave doubt on this explanation. The work of the past thirty years, however, has shown that, from an anatomic and pathologic standpoint at least, intestinal obstructions can be divided into two major types or a combination of the two. The terms simple and strangulation obstruction

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