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Article
July 1940

SPONTANEOUS PNEUMOTHORAX FOLLOWING POSITIVE PRESSURE INTRATRACHEAL ANESTHESIA: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery of the University of Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1940;41(1):61-65. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1940.01210010064004
Abstract

Since the introduction of intratracheal anesthesia by Elsberg in 1909, this method of administration has become increasingly popular, especially in the field of thoracic surgery. Elsberg1 mentioned the difficulties in determining the size of the catheter to be used in order to produce the desired distention of the lung. The determining factor is the freedom of outflow around the catheter. The importance of this is well illustrated in a case recently reported by Bradshaw.2

As to the exact amount of positive pressure which may be safely used, there seem to be marked differences in opinion. Coryllos,3 as a result of his experimental work on human beings and dogs with the E and J resuscitator (using from plus 14 mm. to minus 9 mm. of mercury through the face mask), concluded that it was impossible to cause even the slightest trauma to the lungs with this pressure. He

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