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Article
April 1942

GANGRENE AND PERFORATION OF THE WALL OF THE GALLBLADDER: A SEQUELA OF ACUTE CHOLECYSTITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery of the New York Hospital and Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Surg. 1942;44(4):677-686. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01210220080005
Abstract

Almost a century ago (1844), James Duncan,1 surgeon at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh, reported an instance of gangrene of the gallbladder which had ruptured, producing peritonitis, followed by death. The diagnosis was made at autopsy. In 1933, Dr. Samuel A. Vest Jr.,2 of Baltimore, collected the reported cases of gangrenous cholecystitis; a total of 71 were gleaned from the literature, and 9 were reported as new. Twenty-three of the 80 patients died as a result of the condition—a mortality rate of 37 per cent. Gangrene of a portion of the entire wall of the gallbladder is, we believe, a sequela of acute cholecystitis and frequently leads to perforation.

By "gangrene of the wall of the gallbladder" we refer to complete necrosis of a portion of the wall in one or more areas; we do not use the term to indicate gangrene of the entire gallbladder. Our reason

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