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Article
November 1942

SODIUM SALTS OF THE SULFONAMIDE COMPOUNDSA STUDY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR LOCAL USE IN WOUNDS

Arch Surg. 1942;45(5):754-763. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1942.01220050065005
Abstract

At present sulfanilamide is the accepted sulfonamide compound for local use in war wounds, compound fractures and the peritoneum.1 Experiments in vitro, however, have clearly shown that sulfadiazine (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido]-pyrimidine) and sulfathiazole (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido]-thiazole) are more potent antibacterial agents than sulfanilamide and are also far more resistant to drug inhibitors, such as paraaminobenzoic acid.2 Actually, against Escherichia coli (frequently a participant in peritonitis following intra-abdominal wounds) 1 mg. of sulfathiazole or sulfadiazine can accomplish as much as 430 mg. of sulfanilamide. To obtain bacteriostasis, furthermore, in the presence of 1 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters of paraaminobenzoic acid (or similar inhibitor of drug action) 15 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters of sulfadiazine or sulfathiazole is required, whereas 6,280 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters of sulfanilamide is necessary! Clinical experience has also demonstrated the superiority of these newer drugs over sulfanilamide and sulfapyridine (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido]-pyridine).3 Nevertheless, these drugs have not supplanted

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