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Article
November 1945

PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY FOR 1944 A REVIEW PREPARED BY AN EDITORIAL BOARD OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONS: VI. CONGENITAL DISLOCATION OF THE HIP

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PHILADELPHIA

Arch Surg. 1945;51(4):283-285. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1945.01230040292009
Abstract

Turner170 stresses the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip. He feels that complications become worse with delay. The physical signs are listed as: I. Unilateral dislocation: (a) apparent shortening, (b) decrease in range of abduction, (c) piston motion, (d) asymmetry of skin folds about the thighs, (e) palpation of the head of the femur, (f) trochanter affected near the anterior superior spine. II. Bilateral dislocation: (a) wide perineum, (b) apparent lordosis, (c) unusually deep skin folds, (d) trochanters unusually near level of anterior superior spines, (e) palpation of femoral heads. It is noted in the roentgenograms that in congenital dislocation (1) the acetabular roof is sloping more than the normal 170 degrees, (2) the acetabulum is shallow, (3) the epiphysis is smaller, (4) the epiphysis is displaced, (5) Shenton's line is disturbed and (6) the metaphysial beak is displaced more laterally. The treatment

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