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Article
April 1946

TREATMENT OF FRACTURES OF THE CARPAL SCAPHOID: A Report of Sixty-Four Cases

Arch Surg. 1946;52(4):445-465. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1946.01230050452005
Abstract

FRACTURE of the carpal scaphoid is a common finding in military practice. But, unlike fractures of the other bones, the clinical picture usually presents no pronounced objective findings, and unless the examiner tests for local tenderness, restriction of dorsiflexion of the wrist and weakness of the hand the diagnosis is overlooked. Often many months may pass before roentgenograms are taken and the fracture discovered. In fact, in some cases roentgenograms taken in the conventional anteroposterior and lateral views may not disclose the fracture, with the result that the actual pathologic condition is not recognized and is improperly treated.1 From the standpoint of time lost and persistence of symptoms, the fractured carpal scaphoid must be considered a major disability, comparable in many respects to fractures of the neck of the femur.

The prolonged disability usually associated with fractures of the carpal scaphoid is due chiefly to three factors: first, failure

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