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Article
February 1947

USE OF SMALL THREADED WIRES IN THE TREATMENT OF FRACTURES: III. Their Use in the Fixation of Bone Grafts

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children and the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1947;54(2):170-182. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1947.01230070175005
Abstract

THE TWO preceding parts of this presentation1 have dealt with the use of the small threaded wire in fractures of the upper and lower extremities respectively. As stated in part I, it was used first by Crego2 in the leg-lengthening procedure and was then used in ordinary skeletal traction. Miller3 in 1939 reported the fixation of bone grafts by means of Kirschner wires. Since the threaded wire had proved superior to the smooth wire in skeletal traction, it was an obvious assumption that it would also afford better fixation for bone grafts.

The first such application of the threaded wire was carried out exactly as recommended by Miller (figs. 1, 2 and 3), the wires being allowed to protrude for subsequent removal. The projection of a wire through the surface of the skin, however, entails some risk of infection. Too, it was soon learned that with proper

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