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Article
November 1949

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE SEROSAL ARTERIOLES IN RESUSCITATION OF THE SMALL BOWEL

Author Affiliations

Professor in Charge of Experimental Physiology, St. Francis College BROOKLYN
From the Department of Surgery, Kings County Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(5):1135-1138. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240041145013

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Abstract

ON MANY occasions the surgeon is confronted with the problem of whether or not an intestinal segment is viable. This is especially true in emergency situations, as when an operation is performed for incarcerated and/or strangulated hernias or for intestinal obstruction. At the operating table valuable time elapses as the surgeon waits patiently to ascertain the return of a bowel loop to normalcy. Since most patients with these conditions are not the best operative condidates, the additional period of anesthesia and exposure of the peritoneal cavity to the atmosphere increases the morbidity. Often this delay, lingering and waiting, is a major factor in producing death.

Thus a rapid diagnostic criterion of viability of the small bowel is of practical importance. Observation at the operating table in this type of situation has brought to light such a criterion. In addition to the clinical observation, experimental evidence in animals is offered in

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