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Article
May 1953

HOMOTRANSPLANTATION OF THE DOG HEART

Author Affiliations

GUELPH, ONT., CANADA
Associate Professor, Department of Physiology, Ontario Veterinary College.

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;66(5):624-636. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260030643010
Abstract

ONE OF the constant findings in a liverless dog is a progressive tachycardia. Consequently, 24 hours after hepatectomy the heart rate of the animal may be about 250 beats a minute. The animal otherwise may appear normal and walk about the room with little evidence to show that it has been subjected to a major operation. In an effort to elucidate the nature of this tachycardia my colleagues and I decided to connect the circulation of a liverless dog with that of a transplanted heart. If the transplant also shows tachycardia, one can be certain that this is a result of a humoral agency consequent upon removal of the liver. Because the technique of homotransplanting a heart turned out to be feasible, once we became familiar with it, we transplanted a series of 30 hearts, of which 23 survived. They beat on an average for 129 hours, and two hearts

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