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Article
February 1961

Double-Helical Reservoir Heart-Lung Machine: Designed for Hypothermic Perfusion; Primed with 5% Glucose in Water; Inducing Hemodilution

Author Affiliations

OKLAHOMA CITY
From the Cardiovascular Section, Mercy Hospital. Supported by private donations.; 430 Northwest 12th Street, Oklahoma City (Dr. Zuhdi, Dr. Carey, Dr. Greer); Fellow in Cardiovascular Research, Mercy Hospital (Dr. McCollough).

Arch Surg. 1961;82(2):320-325. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1961.01300080148015
Abstract

The past few years have brought about a variety of techniques for direct-vision intracardiac surgery. External hypothermia was used first, but because of its limitations it has been largely replaced by other techniques. A disposable, autoclavable, simple, small-volume oxygenator with minimal destruction to blood elements would seem to most nearly meet the requirements of an ideal oxygenator.1 Because of flow-reservoir-oxygenation relationships, the combination of hypothermia and extracorporeal circulation may simplify the construction of such a heart-lung machine.2 A relatively small-volume apparatus for hypothermic total-body cardiopulmonary bypass will be described and its clinical application related. The priming of this system with 5% dextrose in water which is actually used for perfusion purposes will be stressed.

Description and Method of Priming of the Heart-Lung Machine for Hypothermic Perfusion  The system is a modified DeWall-Lillehei oxygenator and is depicted in Figure 1.3,4 The details of the design of the doublehelical reservoir heart-lung machine

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