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Article
September 1966

Biological Substrates and Cure Rates of Cyanoacrylate Tissue Adhesives

Author Affiliations

USAR; USAR; WASHINGTON, DC
From the Division of Surgery, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and the US Army Medical Biomechanical Research Laboratory, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Arch Surg. 1966;93(3):428-432. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1966.01330030058013
Abstract

METHYL-2-CYANOACRYLATE is a monomer which rapidly polymerizes on contact with water or other surfaces which may serve as a source of anions. Because of its ability to adhere to living tissue surfaces and to form a strong bond when applied in a thin layer, methyl-2-cyanoacrylate has been used experimentally and clinically as a tissue adhesive and hemostasis inducing compound.1 Local tissue necrosis with this compound is very apparent, however, and work in progress at this center indicates that the higher N-alkyl substituted homologues of the 2-cyanoacrylates retain the necessary adhesive properties and exhibit significantly lower toxicity.2

While investigating the series of N-alkyl-2-cyanoacrylates in experimental surgical applications in dogs, differences in rates of polymerization were encountered which are contrary to what is known from in vitro water-based studies. It appears that the rate of polymer formation with the longer side chain compounds is considerably faster on

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