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Article
February 1968

Carcinoma of the Breast in Children

Author Affiliations

Madison, Wis
From the Division of Clinical Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison.

Arch Surg. 1968;96(2):222-225. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1968.01330200060010
Abstract

CARCINOMA of the breast is uncommon in children and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The exact incidence cannot be determined although some reports indicated 0.09% or less of all the mammary cancers occurred in patients under the age of 20.1,2 In a review of 10,000 cases of breast cancer in the Memorial Hospital in New York, only seven cases were found in children,3 the youngest patient being 3 years old. Although most of the cases reported were in girls, a few breast cancers occurred in boys.4

In most of the cases, the main finding was a painless nodule discovered by the parents or by the physician during a routine examination. Due to the relatively small amount of breast tissue present in children, the tumor was almost always found near, although discrete from, the nipple.3 Unfortunately, breast cancer usually was not diagnosed

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