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Article
May 1978

Endotoxin-Challenged Monkeys and RatsGlucocorticoid Effect on the Serotonin Level in the Blood

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pathology, University of Health Sciences/Chicago Medical School at Veterans Administration Hospital, North Chicago (Dr Erve); Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Department of Surgery (Dr Schuler); and Department of Surgery, University of Health Sciences/Chicago Medical School at Veterans Administration Hospital, North Chicago (Dr Schumer).

Arch Surg. 1978;113(5):561-564. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1978.01370170023003
Abstract

• Studies in our laboratory with both the monkey and the rat showed that, after three hours of endotoxemia, there was a significant decrease in the number of circulating platelets, total hemolytic complement (CH 50 units), and blood serotonin (5-HT) levels. Administration of dexamethasone sodium phosphate in the clinical dose range at the time of endotoxin challenge significantly attenuated the decrease in blood 5-HT levels when compared to the untreated groups in both the monkey and the rat experiments. In the monkey, CH 50 units remained at a higher level when dexamethasone was administered; however, the difference between the treated and untreated groups was not statistically significant. The number of circulating white blood cells and platelets did not appear to be significantly altered by corticosteroid treatment. It is suggested that glucocorticoids may interfere with lipopolysaccharide-induced alterations in complement components or factors regulating hemostasis that influence platelet 5-HT release.

(Arch Surg 113:561-564, 1978)

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