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Article
January 1997

Impaired Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Human Hepatic Arteries After Preservation With the University of Wisconsin Solution

Arch Surg. 1997;132(1):7-12. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1997.01430250009001
Abstract

Objective:  To evaluate the effect of University of Wisconsin solution on endothelium-dependent relaxation and contraction of human hepatic arteries in vitro.

Design:  Human hepatic arteries were harvested from 24 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who had undergone hepatectomy.

Setting:  A tertiary care center.

Interventions:  Human hepatic arteries (n=6 in each group) were harvested during resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. The arteries in group 1 (ie, the control group) were immediately studied without preservation. The arteries in group 2 were preserved in cold (4°C) physiological solution for 1 hour, while the arteries in groups 3 and 4 were preserved in University of Wisconsin solution for 1 and 16 hours, respectively. Segments of control and preserved hepatic arteries with or without endothelium were then suspended in organ chambers to measure the isometric force.

Results:  The relaxation of segments of the hepatic arteries with endothelium in response to acetylcholine and adenosine diphosphate was significantly (P<.05) greater than that of segments without endothelium. The maximal relaxation of hepatic arterial segments with endothelium in groups 3 and 4 in response to acetylcholine was notably different from that of segments in groups 1 and 2. The maximal relaxation of hepatic arterial segments with endothelium in groups 3 and 4 in response to adenosine diphosphate was notably different from that of segments in groups 1 and 2. Perfusate hypoxia (mean±SD Po2,30±5 mm Hg) caused the endothelium-dependent contraction of the arteries (the median initial tension in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 251%, 233%, 276%, and 260%, respectively; P>.05).

Conclusions:  The endothelium-dependent relaxation of human hepatic arteries in response to acetylcholine and adenosine diphosphate was notably attenuated by University of Wisconsin solution. The impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation by University of Wisconsin solution and the prominent endothelium-dependent contraction of human hepatic arteries would favor vasospasm and thrombosis after hepatic transplantation.Arch Surg. 1997;132:7-12

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