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  • Assessment of the Prevalence and Trajectory of Depressive Symptoms by Sexual Orientation During Physician Training

    Abstract Full Text
    open access
    JAMA Health Forum. 2022; 3(4):e220812. doi: 10.1001/jamahealthforum.2022.0812

    This cohort study uses survey data to assess the prevalence and development of depressive symptoms among sexual minority and heterosexual physicians during residency training.

  • Program Access, Depressive Symptoms, and Medical Errors Among Resident Physicians With Disability

    Abstract Full Text
    open access
    JAMA Netw Open. 2021; 4(12):e2141511. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.41511

    This cohort study uses data from a survey of US medical interns to assess the prevalence of self-reported disability and program accommodations and the association between accommodations, depressive symptoms, and self-reported medical errors among resident physicians.

  • Experiences of Work-Family Conflict and Mental Health Symptoms by Gender Among Physician Parents During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Abstract Full Text
    open access is active quiz
    JAMA Netw Open. 2021; 4(11):e2134315. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.34315

    This cohort study evaluates the association of the COVID-19 pandemic with gender differences in work-family factors and mental health among physician parents.

  • Mental Health of Young Physicians in China During the Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 Outbreak

    Abstract Full Text
    open access is active quiz
    JAMA Netw Open. 2020; 3(6):e2010705. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.10705

    This cohort study assesses anxiety, depression, mood, and fear of workplace violence in a cohort of young physicians in China before and during the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak.

  • Gender Disparities in Work and Parental Status Among Early Career Physicians

    Abstract Full Text
    open access
    JAMA Netw Open. 2019; 2(8):e198340. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.8340

    This survey study examines how gender disparities are associated with attrition from the workforce and how family considerations are associated with decisions about how much to work.

  • Work-Family Conflict and the Sex Difference in Depression Among Training Physicians

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(12):1766-1772. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5138

    This prospective longitudinal study examines the increase in depressive symptoms during physicians’ internship year, its potentially disproportionate effect on women, and work-family conflict as a risk factor.