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  • Improving the Health of the American Indian and Alaska Native Population

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2021; 325(11):1035-1036. doi: 10.1001/jama.2021.0521

    This Viewpoint reviews evidence of poor health outcomes experienced by American Indian/Alaska Native persons owing to structural disadvantage and proposes an aggressive agenda to improve their health and well-being by addressing social determinants of health, improving access to and quality of care, and improving data availability and transparency.

  • Assessment of Prevalence and Cost of Care Cascades After Routine Testing During the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit

    Abstract Full Text
    open access
    JAMA Netw Open. 2020; 3(12):e2029891. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.29891

    This cohort study uses US Medicare claims data to estimate the prevalence of routine electrocardiogram, urinalyses, and thyrotropin tests performed during annual wellness visits and assesses the prevalence and cost of laboratory tests, imaging tests, procedures, visits, hospitalizations, and new diagnoses that may follow.

  • Patient and Visit Characteristics Associated With Use of Direct Scheduling in Primary Care Practices

    Abstract Full Text
    open access
    JAMA Netw Open. 2020; 3(8):e209637. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.9637

    This cross-sectional study examines the patient and visit characteristics associated with online portal-based scheduling of medical visits.

  • Investing in the Health of American Indians and Alaska Natives

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2020; 180(5):633-634. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0189

    This Viewpoint discusses the importance of investing in the health of American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

  • Factors Associated With Increased Collection of Patient-Reported Outcomes Within a Large Health Care System

    Abstract Full Text
    open access
    JAMA Netw Open. 2020; 3(4):e202764. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.2764

    This cohort study examines factors associated with increased collection of patient reported outcomes by clinics in a large health care system.

  • Cascades of Care After Incidental Findings in a US National Survey of Physicians

    Abstract Full Text
    open access
    JAMA Netw Open. 2019; 2(10):e1913325. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.13325

    This survey study estimates the national frequency and consequences of cascades of care after incidental findings using results from a national survey of US physicians.

  • Prevalence and Cost of Care Cascades After Low-Value Preoperative Electrocardiogram for Cataract Surgery in Fee-for-Service Medicare Beneficiaries

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2019; 179(9):1211-1219. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1739

    This cohort study reviews data from fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries without known heart disease who underwent cataract surgery to compare care cascades (tests, treatments, visits, hospitalizations, a and new diagnoses) between those who received preoperative electrocardiograms and those who did not.

  • Evaluation of Barriers to Telehealth Programs and Dermatological Care for American Indian Individuals in Rural Communities

    Abstract Full Text
    free access has multimedia
    JAMA Dermatol. 2019; 155(8):899-905. doi: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2019.0872

    This study describes the scarcity of dermatological services and practitioners as well as community infrastructures or resources for American Indian people who live in isolated areas in the United States.

  • Effect of a Remotely Delivered Tailored Multicomponent Approach to Enhance Medication Taking for Patients With Hyperlipidemia, Hypertension, and Diabetes: The STIC2IT Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Intern Med. 2018; 178(9):1182-1189. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3189

    This cluster randomized clinical trial evaluates the effect of a remotely delivered multicomponent behaviorally tailored intervention vs usual care on adherence to medications for hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes in patients who are nonadherent to prescribed medications.

  • Health Reform and Coverage Changes Among Native Americans

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(6):858-860. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1695

    This study evaluates changes in insurance and Indian Health Service coverage among Native Americans following the Affordable Care Act’s implementation.

  • Effect of Financial Incentives to Physicians, Patients, or Both on Lipid Levels: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access has multimedia
    JAMA. 2015; 314(18):1926-1935. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.14850

    This randomized trial investigated the effects of financial incentives paid to physicians, patients, and both on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels among patients with high cardiovascular risk.

  • Patient Referrals: A Linchpin for Increasing the Value of Care

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(6):597-598. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.7878
  • Electronic Patient Messages to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Intern Med. 2011; 171(7):636-641. doi: 10.1001/archinternmed.2010.467
    Background

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality, yet effective screening tests are often underused. Electronic patient messages and personalized risk assessments delivered via an electronic personal health record could increase screening rates.

    Methods

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 14 ambulatory health centers involving 1103 patients ranging in age from 50 to 75 years with an active electronic personal health record who were overdue for colorectal cancer screening. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a single electronic message highlighting overdue screening status with a link to a Web-based tool to assess their personal risk of colorectal cancer. The outcomes included colorectal cancer screening rates at 1 and 4 months.

    Results

    Screening rates were higher at 1 month for patients who received electronic messages than for those who did not (8.3% vs 0.2%, P < .001), but this difference was no longer significant at 4 months (15.8% vs 13.1%, P = .18). Of 552 patients randomized to receive the intervention, 296 (54%) viewed the message, and 47 (9%) used the Web-based risk assessment tool. Among 296 intervention patients who viewed the electronic message, risk tool users were more likely than nonusers to request screening examinations (17% vs 4%, P = .04) and to be screened (30% vs 15%, P = .06). One-fifth of patients (19%) using the risk assessment tool were estimated to have an above-average risk for colorectal cancer.

    Conclusion

    Electronic messages to patients produce an initial increase in colorectal cancer screening rates, but this effect is not sustained over time.

    Trial Registration

    clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01032746

  • Patient and Physician Reminders to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Intern Med. 2009; 169(4):364-371. doi: 10.1001/archinternmed.2008.564
  • Physician Performance and Racial Disparities in Diabetes Mellitus Care

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Intern Med. 2008; 168(11):1145-1151. doi: 10.1001/archinte.168.11.1145
  • Missed Opportunities in the Primary Care Management of Early Acute Ischemic Heart Disease

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Intern Med. 2006; 166(20):2237-2243. doi: 10.1001/archinte.166.20.2237
  • Effect of Quality Improvement on Racial Disparities in Diabetes Care

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Intern Med. 2006; 166(6):675-681. doi: 10.1001/archinte.166.6.675
  • “I Wish I Had Seen This Test Result Earlier!”: Dissatisfaction With Test Result Management Systems in Primary Care

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Intern Med. 2004; 164(20):2223-2228. doi: 10.1001/archinte.164.20.2223